Chanel Honours Marist Bi-Centenary

Dr Hills celebrates

Chanel Honours Marist Bi-Centenary with Totara Trees

Chanel College planted five totara trees donated by founding staff member, Dr Claire Hills, to commemorate the bicentenary of the Marist Brothers, founded in France in 1817 by Marcellin Champagnat, who was passionate about the power of education to transform people’s lives. The totara trees represent the five pillars of Marist Spirituality: Presence, Simplicity, Family Spirit, Love of Work and In the Way of Mary.  The totara tree was chosen because it is the most important tree in the Maori world. Not only is it regarded as a chiefly tree. It also symbolises everything that roots us, anchors us, identifies us and locates us.  The Marist Brothers, who established St Joseph’s College in 1945, were one of the two founding orders of Chanel College:  St Jospeh’s College and St Bride’s College merged to establish Chanel College in 1978.

In keeping with Maori tradition, the plantings were accompanied by karakia offered by Mr Frank McNally, teacher of Te Reo, and waiata sung by the students and staff. The trees were planted by Mr John Hymers, Chairperson of the Chanel College Board of trustees, Principal, Grant Miles, Dr Claire Hills, Carl Tapp, Principal of St Joseph’s College (1971-76) and Chanel Head students Tayla-Cade Gerrard and Kenta McKelvey.

 

In addition to the five totara trees two New Zealand beech trees were planted, the first to commemorate St Bride’s College founded in 1898 by the Brigidine Order, planted by Sister Monica Landy CSB  and the second to recognise the Maori community at Chanel, planted by Kaumatua Joe Mutu and Frank McNally.  The two beech trees were planted by Sister Monica, the last surviving Brigidine Sister in Masterton, and Kenta McKelvey, Head Boy of Chanel College.

Maori have used totara for generations, not only in the carvings that adorn marae, but also for building waka which could carry up to one hundred men in battle. Pakeha soon learned to respect the strength and versatility of totara in the building of houses, piles and fences.

Throughout their history, the establishing schools has been a significant part of the ministry of the Marist Brothers.  The Marist Order is now found in seventy-nine countries on five continents. After their arrival in New Zealand in 1876 they made a huge contribution to our educational history through the schools they established in Wellington. Auckland, Hamilton, Napier, Whanganui, Palmerston North, Lower Hutt, Christchurch, Greymouth, Invercargill and Masterton. As well as establishing schools in India and Pakistan the Marist Brothers established schools in Vietnam, the Philippines, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga and Kiribati.  Chanel College 2017 students chose Kiribati as their fundraising focus for their annual Caritas walkathon.

St Joseph’s College was founded as a memorial to the men and women of the Wairarapa who lost their lives in World War II. The first two Marist Brothers Brother Adrian and Brother Sylvester, were men of great courage and resilience. They gave a whole new meaning to the phrase ‘making a leap of faith. When St Joseph’s College started the college buildings did not exist. The brothers taught the first sixty-one boys in two classrooms in the old St Patrick’s School run by the Brigidine susters until the college opened on the Herbert Street site in 1946 when they were joined by Brother Calixtus


Dr Hills speech


 

Chanel Honours Marist Bi-Centenary with Totara Trees

We have gathered here today to plant seven trees. 

The five totara trees are being planted to commemorate the bicentenary of the Marist Brothers. Chanel College began when St Bride’s College and St Joseph’s College merged to form Chanel College in 1978. St Joseph’s College was a Marist college.

We are very pleased that joining us today we have Carl Tapp, a former Principal of St Joseph’s College, and Sister Monica, one of the Brigidine sisters.

The Marist Brothers were founded in France in 1817 by Marcellin Champagnat, who was passionate about the power of education to transform people’s lives. As people of Chanel we are also part of the Marist family.

Marist Brothers work in seventy-nine countries on five continents. They established in Wellington. Auckland, Hamilton, Napier, Whanganui, Palmerston North, Lower Hutt, Christchurch, Greymouth, Invercargill and Masterton.  We are all part of that. As well as establishing schools in India and Pakistan the Marist Brothers established schools in Vietnam, the Philippines, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga and Kiribati. We are all part of that.   Chanel College 2017 students chose Kiribati as their fundraising focus for their annual Caritas walkathon.

The first two Marist Brothers were men of great courage and resilience. Brother Adrian and Brother Sylvester  are role models for us because they gave a whole new meaning to the phrase ‘making a leap of faith. When St Joseph’s College started the college buildings did not exist. The brothers taught the first sixty-one boys in two classrooms in the old St Patrick’s School run by the Brigidine sisters until the college opened on the Herbert Street site in 1946 and more brothers arrived. These men were role models because they were people who were knew that giving was more important than taking. They were role models for us because they were about facing up to challenges and building up not running away from challenges.  They built and strengthened community. They did not tear it down. They are role models for us because it is because of their efforts and the efforts of the Brigidine sisters that we are able to build the college today and we are all the kaitiaki of Chanel.

 

So take a good look at these totara trees. They have chosen for a reason.

They represent the five pillars of Marist Spirituality: Presence, Simplicity, Family Spirit, Love of Work and In the Way of Mary.  

The totara tree is the most important tree in the Maori world. It is regarded as a chiefly tree. It also symbolises everything that roots us, anchors us, identifies us and locates us.

We are the kaitiaki of these trees at Chanel. When we plant them we remember the past as we work together to create a future of which we can be proud.

 

Tree 1                   Dr Claire Hills

Tree 2                   Grant Miles, Principal of Chanel College

Tree 3                   Carl Tapp, former Principal of St Joseph’s College

Tree 4                   Mr John Hymers, Chairperson of the Chanel College Board of Trustees,

Tree 5                   Tayla Cade Gerrard

Tree 6                   Kenta Mckelvey

Tree 7                   Sister Monica CSB

 

 

Presence, Simplicity, Family Spirit, Love of Work,  In the way of Mary

 

Chanel Honours Marist Bi-Centenary with Totara Trees

Chanel College planted five totara trees donated by founding staff member, Dr Claire Hills, to commemorate the bicentenary of the Marist Brothers, founded in France in 1817 by Marcellin Champagnat, who was passionate about the power of education to transform people’s lives. The totara trees represent the five pillars of Marist Spirituality: Presence, Simplicity, Family Spirit, Love of Work and In the Way of Mary.  The totara tree was chosen because it is the most important tree in the Maori world. Not only is it regarded as a chiefly tree. It also symbolises everything that roots us, anchors us, identifies us and locates us.  The Marist Brothers, who established St Joseph’s College in 1945, were one of the two founding orders of Chanel College:  St Jospeh’s College and St Bride’s College merged to establish Chanel College in 1978.

In keeping with Maori tradition, the plantings were accompanied by karakia offered by Mr Frank McNally, teacher of Te Reo, and waiata sung by the students and staff. The trees were planted by Mr John Hymers, Chairperson of the Chanel College Board of trustees, Principal, Grant Miles, Dr Claire Hills, Carl Tapp, Principal of St Joseph’s College (1971-76) and Chanel Head students Tayla-Cade Gerrard and Kenta McKelvey.

 

In addition to the five totara trees two New Zealand beech trees were planted, the first to commemorate St Bride’s College founded in 1898 by the Brigidine Order, planted by Sister Monica Landy CSB  and the second to recognise the Maori community at Chanel, planted by Kaumatua Joe Mutu and Frank McNally.  The two beech trees were planted by Sister Monica, the last surviving Brigidine Sister in Masterton, and Kenta McKelvey, Head Boy of Chanel College.

Maori have used totara for generations, not only in the carvings that adorn marae, but also for building waka which could carry up to one hundred men in battle. Pakeha soon learned to respect the strength and versatility of totara in the building of houses, piles and fences.

Throughout their history, the establishing schools has been a significant part of the ministry of the Marist Brothers.  The Marist Order is now found in seventy-nine countries on five continents. After their arrival in New Zealand in 1876 they made a huge contribution to our educational history through the schools they established in Wellington. Auckland, Hamilton, Napier, Whanganui, Palmerston North, Lower Hutt, Christchurch, Greymouth, Invercargill and Masterton. As well as establishing schools in India and Pakistan the Marist Brothers established schools in Vietnam, the Philippines, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga and Kiribati.  Chanel College 2017 students chose Kiribati as their fundraising focus for their annual Caritas walkathon.

St Joseph’s College was founded as a memorial to the men and women of the Wairarapa who lost their lives in World War II. The first two Marist Brothers Brother Adrian and Brother Sylvester, were men of great courage and resilience. They gave a whole new meaning to the phrase ‘making a leap of faith. When St Joseph’s College started the college buildings did not exist. The brothers taught the first sixty-one boys in two classrooms in the old St Patrick’s School run by the Brigidine susters until the college opened on the Herbert Street site in 1946 when they were joined by Brother Calixtus. 

 

 

 

Brother Carl
Sister Monica
Some of the tree planting party
Dr Hills plants her tree